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Multipurpose Items Are the Key to Lightweight Backpacking

Are you trying to figure out how to cram everything into your pack without making it so heavy that you can’t walk more than a few steps? Check out these tips from Mark Crews, the co-owner of Apex Outdoor Gear in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He was recently featured in an article in the Outdoors section of the Grand Rapids Press. I think even seasoned, veteran backpackers will find some helpful ideas here.

As you can probably tell from this blog, I tend to be swayed by high-tech, newfangled, lightweight gadgets with some hefty price tags. Mark points out that the most lightweight items aren’t necessarily the most expensive ones – valuable advice that I need to keep in mind. Even those trusty Nalgene water bottles that I throw into my pack without questioning could be replaced with a lighter and virtually no-cost soda bottle.

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I’m not quite ready to take all the advice that he’s doling out (Using a bandana as toilet paper? No thank you!), but his remarks on compression backpacks, stuffsacks, and knives are words of wisdom.

He also takes a balanced approach and recognizes that backpacking is supposed to be fun, and hence it makes sense to bring along a few luxury items, such as chocolate and beef jerky, even if they do add a few ounces to the weight of your pack.

And the one gem of the article? Crew says that when your trek ends, you should “divide items systematically into three categories: always used, never used and sometimes used.” That makes a lot of sense to me, since you can use this info to pack more quickly and easily for your next trip.

Comments (2)

  1. Errol Cobine

    n ancient times, the backpack was used as a means to carry the hunter’s larger game and other types of prey and as a way of easier transport for other materials. In the cases of larger hunts, the hunters would dismember their prey and distribute the pieces of the animal around, each one packing the meat into many wrappings and then into bags which they placed on to their backs.:;..’

    Head to our website as well
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  2. STA traevl has a GREAT traevl insurance policy. I’m doing study abroad in Germany as well, starting in July, and I purchased some from them that covered property, health, repatriation and all that for only $130. For longer trips I think it goes as high as maybe $300 VERY inexpensive compared to other companies I’ve come across when doing research.

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